Hampton Beach fireworks postponed due to nesting piping plovers

Firework shows at Hampton Beach are on hold for a few weeks, including Sunday night because of an endangered species of birds. They are a rare, federally-threatened species that only nest on sandy beaches like here at Hampton Beach and over at Seabrook.Officials tell News 9 there are a record number of plovers that are nesting right now so it’s important for beachgoers to keep an eye out and keep their distance. There are only 2,000 pairs of birds that nest every year. This year, there are 16 pairs of piping plovers nesting in New Hampshire, which is a record. Brendan Clifford, a wildlife biologist with New Hampshire Fish and Game , said they typically nest in dunes or dune grass. However, when beaches cleared because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the birds began nesting in more open areas that officials have roped off. “It’s a strong conservation effort that we have, we use a lot of volunteers, we use a lot of community outreach,” Clifford said. “The more support we have for the Plovers, the better. Spreading word of mouth is really how it works best.” While there are a lot of volunteers on standby to help with conservation efforts, Clifford said the public has to give the birds some space, too. The quicker the birds feed, the quicker they leave, and then regular beach activities can resume. “We do our best to accommodate the people, but we have to also accommodate the birds and the fireworks just were going to be too close to the nest this year,” Clifford said. The first nest hatched on Saturday. The eggs typically begin hatching in JuneClifford said you should try to keep your pets away if you happen to be near a nest and said the bulk of the birds are expected to hatch between now and the end of June.

Firework shows at Hampton Beach are on hold for a few weeks, including Sunday night because of an endangered species of birds.

The birds are called ‘piping plovers’. They are a rare, federally-threatened species that only nest on sandy beaches like here at Hampton Beach and over at Seabrook.

Officials tell News 9 there are a record number of plovers that are nesting right now so it’s important for beachgoers to keep an eye out and keep their distance.

There are only 2,000 pairs of birds that nest every year.

This year, there are 16 pairs of piping plovers nesting in New Hampshire, which is a record.

Brendan Clifford, a wildlife biologist with New Hampshire Fish and Game, said they typically nest in dunes or dune grass. However, when beaches cleared because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the birds began nesting in more open areas that officials have roped off.

“It’s a strong conservation effort that we have, we use a lot of volunteers, we use a lot of community outreach,” Clifford said. “The more support we have for the Plovers, the better. Spreading word of mouth is really how it works best.”

While there are a lot of volunteers on standby to help with conservation efforts, Clifford said the public has to give the birds some space, too.

The quicker the birds feed, the quicker they leave, and then regular beach activities can resume.

“We do our best to accommodate the people, but we have to also accommodate the birds and the fireworks just were going to be too close to the nest this year,” Clifford said.

The first nest hatched on Saturday. The eggs typically begin hatching in June

Clifford said you should try to keep your pets away if you happen to be near a nest and said the bulk of the birds are expected to hatch between now and the end of June.

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