‘Buddy’s Law’ named for dog burned by child

‘Buddy’s Law’ named for dog burned by child

Buddy recovered and is now living with veterinarian who treated him

A new Mississippi law is named for a dog that survived being set on fire.Gov. Tate Reeves signed Senate Bill 2245, known as “Buddy’s Law,” during a ceremony Thursday. The law requires youth court to order a psychiatric evaluation of a child charged with “the intentional torturing, mutilating, maiming, burning, starving to death, crushing, disfiguring, drowning, suffocating or impaling of a domesticated dog or cat.” The law is named after Buddy, who was severely burned in April 2021 by a 12-year-old boy. Buddy underwent extensive treatment, including skin grafts, since the incident. Buddy attended the ceremony with Dr. Katherine Swanson, a veterinarian who had treated him at the Mississippi State University Veterinary School. Buddy now lives with Swanson at her home, along with her other dogs. Buddy’s Law also requires that any evaluation, counseling and treatment will be paid for by the offender’s parent or guardian or by the state if the child is a ward of the state.

A new Mississippi law is named for a dog that survived being set on fire.

Govt. Tate Reeves signed Senate Bill 2245, known as “Buddy’s Law,” during a ceremony Thursday. The law requires youth court to order a psychiatric evaluation of a child charged with “the intentional torturing, mutilating, maiming, burning, starving to death, crushing, disfiguring, drowning, suffocating or impaling of a domesticated dog or cat.”

The law is named after Buddy, who was severely burned in April 2021 by a 12-year-old boy. Buddy underwent extensive treatment, including skin grafts, since the incident.

Buddy attended the ceremony with Dr. Katherine Swanson, a veterinarian who had treated him at the Mississippi State University Veterinary School. Buddy now lives with Swanson at her home, along with her other dogs.

Buddy’s Law also requires that any evaluation, counseling and treatment will be paid for by the offender’s parent or guardian or by the state if the child is a ward of the state.

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